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Manipulating Weight Training Variables: Time Under Tension

That includes a combination of cardio exercising such as: swimming, biking, jogging or walking. Strength exercises such as pilates, yoga or a simple weight training schedule. And athletics such as: tennis, golf, soccer, kayaking, rowing or mountain climbing. There’s nothing like an exercise combination to get our bodies working hard to keep us healthy.

To deal with the schedule that I work within I have opted for a weight training schedule of, alternating body part, super sets and giant sets. Training 4 days a week in a split routine with Chest, Back and Abs on Mondays and Thursdays and Arms and Legs on Tuesdays and Fridays. Each body part is worked with 3-5 sets a body part performed in a progressive weight increase manner and with very little time between sets to keep the intensity high, each workout period being only about 40 minutes in duration, this keeps my heart and work rate high delivering a very high conditioning effect that is essential for the rigors of Muay Thai and Mixed Martial Arts training.

Weight training is primarily an isotonic form of exercise, as the force produced by the muscle to push or pull weighted objects should not change (though in practice the force produced does decrease as muscles fatigue). Any object can be used for weight training, but dumbbells, barbells, and other specialised equipment are normally used because they can be adjusted to specific weights and are easily gripped. Many exercises are not strictly isotonic because the force on the muscle varies as the joint moves through its range of motion. Movements can become easier or harder depending on the angle of muscular force relative to gravity; for example, a standard biceps curl becomes easier as the hand approaches the shoulder as more of the load is taken by the structure of the elbow. Certain machines such as the Nautilus involve special adaptations to keep resistance constant irrespective of the joint angle.

Now there is MMA weight training. Mixed martial arts, or MMA, may be the most complex sport in terms of training a fighter’s strength and conditioning to optimal levels. MMA weight training, unlike most sports or forms of weight training, requires the martial artist to develop virtually every benefit that weights can possibly provide. Power lifters for example, need only train to have maximum power in lifting the heaviest weight possible for 1 rep for a particular lift. Things like muscular endurance doesn’t apply much to these athletes.

http://nashfittraining.com http://nashjocic.com Fitness expert Nash Jocic talks about advantages of weight training over cardio exercises for fat loss. Learn from Nash how weight training…

Reason 2, weight training strengthens your bones.  In case no one has told you but your bones deteriorate at a faster rate also as we get older, so to preserve bone mass and strength then one MUST weight train.

An MMA weight training workout should look different than a traditional workout. The MMA workout must focus on the body as a whole and have a ferocious blend of strength and speed to producepower. Power comes through explosiveness and core strength, so your workouts should mirror those ideas. Here is an example of what an upper body workout for MMA should look like:

In one common method, weight training uses the principle of progressive overload, in which the muscles are overloaded by attempting to lift at least as much weight as they are capable. They respond by growing larger and stronger. This procedure is repeated with progressively heavier weights as the practitioner gains strength and endurance.

In addition to the basic principles of strength training, a further consideration added by weight training is the equipment used. Types of equipment include barbells, dumbbells, pulleys and stacks in the form of weight machines, and the body’s own weight in the case of chin-ups and push-ups. Different types of weights will give different types of resistance, and often the same absolute weight can have different relative weights depending on the type of equipment used. For example, lifting 10 kilograms using a dumbbell sometimes requires more force than moving 10 kilograms on a weight stack if certain pulley arrangements are used. In other cases, the weight stack may require more force than the equivalent dumbbell weight due to additional torque or resistance in the machine. Additionally, although they may display the same weight stack, different machines may be heavier or lighter depending on the number of pulleys and their arrangements.