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Why Start A Weight Training Program

As the sport of wrestling continues to grow (with at least some thanks going to the increasing popularity of MMA), weight training for wrestling has become a very sought after. There are two major issues that I’ve seen with weight training for wrestling programs in my years of experience.

An MMA weight training workout should look different than a traditional workout. The MMA workout must focus on the body as a whole and have a ferocious blend of strength and speed to producepower. Power comes through explosiveness and core strength, so your workouts should mirror those ideas. Here is an example of what an upper body workout for MMA should look like:

Microtrauma, which is tiny damage to the fibers, may play a significant role in muscle growth. When microtrauma occurs (from weight training or other strenuous activities), the body responds by overcompensating, replacing the damaged tissue and adding more, so that the risk of repeat damage is reduced. Damage to these fibers has been theorized as the possible cause for the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and is why progressive overload is essential to continued improvement, as the body adapts and becomes more resistant to stress.

The effects of weight training aren’t always all good. Working your muscles too hard either through an excessive number of repetitions or by using too heavy a weight can lead to minor and major injuries. Fortunately, injury can always be avoided in weight training simply by being careful, pushing your limits gradually, and always listening to your body.

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All baseball players however can benefit from a good weight training program. Strength training will give every baseball player-Better performance, injury avoidance/career longevity, improved recovery rate, improve pitching speed, sustaining/increasing muscle strength and balance, and improved upper body strength

As with most weight training routines, your body will adapt to what you are doing, even the two mentioned already. Therefore you have to use other ways to progress with your weight training, which we will have a look at now.

Although weight training is similar to bodybuilding, they have different objectives. Bodybuilders use weight training to develop their muscles for size, shape, and symmetry regardless of any increase in strength for competition in bodybuilding contests; they train to maximize their muscular size and develop extremely low levels of body fat. In contrast, many weight trainers train to improve their strength and anaerobic endurance while not giving special attention to reducing body fat far below normal.

Weight training causes micro-tears to the muscles being trained; this is generally known as microtrauma. These micro-tears in the muscle contribute to the soreness felt after exercise, called delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). It is the repair to these micro-trauma that result in muscle growth. Normally, this soreness becomes most apparent a day or two after a workout. However, as muscles become adapted to the exercises, soreness tends to decrease.

Last but not least, mix it up and have fun with it. The great thing about MMA weight training is that because you need to develop every type of strength and conditioning possible, there are so many different exercises and workouts you can do. Just make sure you know the purpose of each exercise/workout and that you are developing the strength and conditioning most needed depending on when you fight.

Rest Muscle grows after you have finished weight training, not during. So the process can take place you need to rest your muscles. If you exercise your muscles everyday, they will not get a chance to recuperate and grow.

The 1960s saw the gradual introduction of exercise machines into the still-rare strength training gyms of the time. Weight training became increasingly popular in the 1970s, following the release of the bodybuilding movie Pumping Iron, and the subsequent popularity of Arnold Schwarzenegger. Since the late 1990s increasing numbers of women have taken up weight training, influenced by programs like Body for Life; currently nearly one in five U.S. women engage in weight training on a regular basis.